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Doug Creamer Column: Our words have power

Doug Creamer writes a religion column twice a month for the SNAP.

I know I must have written about this topic at some point, but it seems to be stirring in my spirit again. I have been thinking about the power of words. I have recently had the privilege of spending some quality time with some good friends and family. The conversations have been deep, rich, and encouraging.

What has struck me the most is that we all have stories, ups and downs in our lives. We all carry scars from the lessons that life has taught us.

While some lessons are easy to learn, others require us to acquire some new bruises. I am not sure why we are so determined to learn things the hard way when we could learn from each other.

Another thing I noticed is that age doesn’t exempt us from new lessons. Some we learn and move on, while others require deep inner struggle.

When I was young, I thought that by a certain age we would master the lessons and live peacefully. It seems that God has a different plan. We learn a lesson, enjoy a brief sigh, and it’s on to the next lesson.

I think we all have much to learn about our careless use of words. We fail to understand the power of our words.

As a teacher, I see students who rarely (if ever) hear the words “I love you” or “I am proud of you.” These are simple yet profound words that we all desire to hear.

As a teacher, I feel it is inappropriate to tell my students I love them, but I have made it a priority to let them know I am proud of them. I have watched the powerful impact of those words as I look directly into my students’ eyes.

I believe we have to watch our words when we talk about our aches and pains. We think they will last forever so we say, “I will never get over this.” These words are powerful because they leave no room for God to heal and restore. When we believe that we will not get better, it becomes like a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Let me share a personal example. I always have trouble with my sinuses in the fall and the spring. I will usually be in bed for several days. In saying this, I leave no room for God to protect or to even heal me. I own it.

My grandmother had some very serious surgeries in her lifetime and she would always say,

“I will be home in a few days and I will get over it.” Do you know what happened each time?

She recovered quickly and was home.

We have to learn to watch our words. I am not suggesting when you have the full-blown flu that you come to church and tell everyone you are healed. But you can rest in bed and believe that you will recover quicker than most people because you serve a God who heals.

Give God room to work in your life. Believe that He can heal you.

We have to learn to watch our words as we speak to and about each other. We have to remember what is said when a person is not present is heard by our Father in Heaven. That should make us all stop and think.

The words we say to each other have profound and long-lasting effects. As a society, we are quick to tear each other down and we fail to build each other up.

We should be using our words to encourage and strengthen each other as we endeavor to live out our Christian faith.

With the power of the tongue we can create or we can destroy. Our Father always speaks words of love and hope to us. We can choose to be like Him and build each other up, or be used by the enemy to discourage.

Our words can change the destiny of others for good or bad. I want to believe the best for others and my words to be filled with love and hope.

I want to encourage you to choose your words carefully.

Are your words filled with venom intending to kill and destroy, or are your words filled with life and peace?

You have the power to choose. God is listening. I want to surround myself with people who believe in me and will speak words of life to me.

I hope people see me as that kind of person: a builder, a supplier of hope, a person of faith, and one whose words bring life.

Contact Doug Creamer at PO Box 777, Faith, NC 28041 or doug@dougcreamer.com.