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Pfeiffer switches to online learning for two weeks due to increase in coronavirus cases

Due to an increase in the number of active coronavirus cases, Pfeiffer University has shifted in-person classes on its Misenheimer campus to online learning for the next two weeks.

The plan is to have in-person classes resume on Oct. 12.

“This gives us a two-week period to kind of reset the health of our campus,” said Casey Habich, director of marketing and communications for Pfeiffer. “It minimizes movement on campus and kind of creates a bubble.”

The transition to online also allows for students in quarantine “the same learning environment” as their non-quarantined peers.

The university currently has 19 total cases, 16 of which are active. The active cases all involve students and are directly related to each other, Habich said.

There are 119 student in quarantine due to possible first-hand exposure to those who have tested positive for the coronavirus. Though in quarantine, only students who exhibit symptoms will be tested, Habich said, citing advice from University Health Services. Quarantine lasts for two weeks.

First-hand exposure is defined as being in close proximity (less than six feet) with someone who has tested positive for more than 15 minutes, Habich said.

The individuals who have tested positive are in isolation, either in a separate facility away from other students on campus or at home.

There are no reports of positive cases on the Albemarle, Charlotte or Raleigh campuses.

During this time, dining services will remain fully operational with to-go options only. The Knapp Fitness Center will operate at a 12-person capacity by appointment only.

Pfeiffer keeps a running tally of coronavirus cases on its website as part of its COVID-19 dashboard, which it updates daily.

If a student or staff member believes they have been exposed to COVID-19, they should either contact University Health Services at 704-463-3425 or their healthcare provider.

About Chris Miller

Chris Miller has been with the SNAP since January 2019. He is a graduate of NC State and received his Master's in Journalism from the University of Maryland. He previously wrote for the Capital News Service in Annapolis, where many of his stories on immigration and culture were published in national papers via the AP wire.

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